Navy Yard Killer Bazaar Paranoia

Aaron Alexis the tormented  lone gunman  believed ‘people were sending vibrations to his body via microwave machine’ six weeks before rampage .

gunman was identified as 34-year-old Aaron Alexis, a former Navy reservist and a current military contractor, the Washington FBI Field Office told CNN. According to sources… Alexis, 34,  who killed 12 people and injured eight before turning the gun on himself at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington D.C. exhibited signs of severe mental illness just six weeks before he embarked on Monday’s shooting rampage.

Alexis was a heavy drinker and played mammoth sessions of violent video games reportedly had a huge chip on his shoulder that he was ‘not man enough’ because his father made him feel inadequate.  The Ex-Navy reservist joined the military in a vain attempt to prove to his dad Algernon, a caregiver, that he could ‘live up to a parent that you just couldn’t live up to’.

Friends and co-workers of revealed today that he was emotionally distraught his Thai girlfriend left him broken-hearted.

The former Navy reservist reportedly called police to his hotel room in Newport, on August 7.  Alexis was reportedly suffering from severe hallucinations and told them voices were speaking to him ‘through the wall, flooring and ceiling’ and that three people were following him and keeping ‘him awake by talking to him and sending vibrations to his body’ through a microwave machine.

When officers arrived to speak to Alexis,  he told them he had moved to three separate hotels that night in an effort to elude the microwave vibrations and that he had become involved in an argument with three people at the airport.  He also suffered from PTSD and  would go for several days without sleep.

Authorities have not released a possible motive in the morning shooting at the headquarters for Naval Sea Systems Command.

Alexis Was Given Honorable Discharge.

See Honorable Discharge

ABOUT Washington Navy Yard:   3,000 people work at the Navy Yard, including junior service members and civilian employees.

Naval Sea Systems Command is the largest of the Navy’s five system commands and accounts for a quarter of the Navy’s entire budget. About 3,000 people work at the Navy Yard, including junior service members and civilian employees. It's supposed to be a secure facility. It builds, buys and maintains the Navy’s ships and submarines and their combat systems.

The Yard currently serves as a ceremonial and administrative center for the U.S. Navy, home to the Chief of Naval Operations, and is headquarters for the Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Historical Center, the Department of Naval History, the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General’s Corps, Naval Reactors, Marine Corps Institute, the United States Navy Band, and other more classified facilities.

It is the former shipyard and ordnance plant of the United States Navy in Southeast Washington, D.C. It is the oldest shore establishment of the U.S. Navy.

In 1998, the yard was listed as a Superfund site due to environmental contamination.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS:
Alexis allegedly drove to the Navy Yard complex with the weapons early Monday … The official said surveillance video of the shooting was being …. a news conference on M Street near the Washington Navy Yard. …. It builds, buys and maintains the Navy’s ships and submarines and their combat systems.
  • A friend says Alexis was frustrated with life
  • Alexis’ family didn’t “see it coming,” his brother-in-law says
  • He used a contractor ID to access the Navy Yard, an official says
  • Alexis claimed he wasn’t paid by his employer, a friend says

Gossip News

Honorable Discharge

To receive an honorable discharge, a service member must have received a rating from good to excellent for his or her service.

To receive an honorable discharge, a service member must have received a rating from good to excellent for his or her service. Service members who meet or exceed the required standards of duty performance and personal conduct, and who complete their tours of duty, normally receive honorable discharges.Service members who meet or exceed the required standards of duty performance and personal conduct, and who complete their tours of duty, normally receive honorable discharges. However, one need not complete a term of service to receive an honorable discharge, provided the reason for involuntary discharge is not due to misconduct. For instance, service members rendered physically or psychologically incapable of performing assigned duties normally have their service characterized as honorable, regardless of whether they incurred the condition or disability in the line of duty, provided they otherwise met or exceeded standards. Similarly, service members selected for involuntary discharge due to a Reduction in Force (RIF) typically receive an honorable discharge, assuming their conduct while on active duty met or exceeded standards.

An honorable discharge can, on rare occasions, be granted to a former service member (whose service was characterized as less than honorable) as an act of clemency, should that person display exemplary post-service conduct and show evidence of outstanding post-service achievement in areas such as education and employment.[citation needed]

United States Marines must have a proficiency and conduct rating of 3.0/4.0 or higher to receive an honorable discharge.

 Military Discharges

Discharge or separation should not be confused with retirement; career U.S. military members who retire are not separated or discharged; rather, they enter the retired reserve and may be subject to recall to active duty.

A discharge completely alleviates the veteran of any unfulfilled military service obligation, whereas a separation (which may be voluntary or involuntary) may leave an additional unfulfilled military service obligation (MSO) that they may carry out in the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR).

Below are some of the most common reasons for discharge:

  • Expiration of Term of Service (ETS)
  • Reaching the maximum age limit
  • High Year Tenure (reaching the maximum allowable time-in-grade, and not selected for promotion)
  • Disability, Dependency, or Hardship
  • Pregnancy/Parenthood
  • Personality Disorder
  • Condition not a disability
  • Physical or Mental Conditions that interfere with military service resulting in being placed on the Temporary or Permanent Disability Retirement Lists
  • Convenience of The Government/Secretarial Authority (voluntary redundancy due to funding cutbacks, for example)
  • Unsuitability
  • Misconduct – Minor Disciplinary Infractions
  • Misconduct – Drug Abuse with and without administrative review board
  • Misconduct – Commission of a serious offense
  • Entry-Level Performance and Conduct
  • Resignation (available to officers only)
  • Reduction in Force (RIF)
  • Uncharacterized if discharged within the first 180 days of service and no misconduct found in service member’s record
  • Punitive Discharges – Bad Conduct Discharge issued by either Special Court Martial or General Court Martial only. Dishonorable Discharge issued by a General Court Martial only

If discharged administratively for any of the above reasons, the service member normally receives an honorable or a general (under honorable conditions) discharge. If misconduct is involved the service member may receive an Other Than Honorable (OTH) Discharge service characterization.

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