Doctors Remove Parasitic Twin from Two-Year-Old

'Pregnant' two-year-old boy gives 'birth' after he has parasitic twin removed from inside his stomach

‘Pregnant’ two-year-old boy gives ‘birth.’

Baby PhotosA two-year-old boy from http://gratitudehouse.org/Event_FashionShow.php Huaxi, China  has undergone an operation to remove the undeveloped  buy Deltasone no prescriptions foetus of his own twin inside his stomach.

get link Xiao Feng, was brought to hospital after his stomach had become so distended and he was having problems breathing.

After a series of medical testing , x-rays and MRI scans the doctors diagnosis his condition as  parasitic twin syndrome.  He was immediately taken into surgery where doctors removed the buy clindamycin phosphate topical solution usp 1 foetus  which measured 20 cm in width and had a fully formed spine and limbs, including fingers and toes.

Identical twins form when an egg splits in half after fertilization.Gossip News

But conjoined twins or foetus-in-foetu siblings occur when the egg fails to fully separate.

According to sources…”The parasitic twin would have developed into a boy and had grown so large that almost 2/3rds of his affected twin’s stomach was taken up.”

Dr Jonathan Fanaroff, a neonatologist at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital in Cleveland, said some conjoined twins can survive as ‘parasites’, but not when one twin absorbs the other.

See Photos Next Day (caution disturbing)

Parasitic or Heteropagus Twins are asymmetric conjoined identical or monozygotic twins in which the tissues of a severely defective twin (parasite) are dependent on the cardiovascular system of the other, largely intact twin (autosite) for survival.

The estimated incidence of heteropagus parasitic twins is approximately 1 per 1 million live births. Isolated case reports comprise most of published work on this rare congenital anomaly.

The condition only occurs when an undeveloped or underdeveloped twin is attached to parts of the body of the twin that develops and is birthed.

The parasitic twin syndrome has been noted in dozens of official cases, but is thought to occur more often due to lack of official documentation of cases in third world countries. Many of these survived, often after surgery to remove the parasitiv twin.

– See more at: http://www.babymed.com/pregnancy-complications/parasitic-twin-pregnancy-vanishing-twin-syndrome#sthash.XVAaK9Ga.dpuf

More about Parasitic Twin Syndrome

Parasitic or Heteropagus Twins are asymmetric conjoined identical or monozygotic twins in which the tissues of a severely defective twin (parasite) are dependent on the cardiovascular system of the other, largely intact twin (autosite) for survival.

The estimated incidence of heteropagus parasitic twins is approximately 1 per 1 million live births. Isolated case reports comprise most of published work on this rare congenital anomaly.

The condition only occurs when an undeveloped or underdeveloped twin is attached to parts of the body of the twin that develops and is birthed.

The parasitic twin syndrome has been noted in dozens of official cases, but is thought to occur more often due to lack of official documentation of cases in third world countries. Many of these survived, often after surgery to remove the parasitiv twin.

 Parasitic Twins

A parasitic twin (also known as an asymmetrical or unequal conjoined twin) is the result of the processes that produce vanishing twins and conjoined twins, and may represent a continuum between the two.  Parasitic twins occur when a twin embryo begins developing in utero, but the pair does not fully separate, and one embryo maintains dominant development at the expense of the other. Unlike conjoined twins, one ceases development during gestation and is vestigial to a mostly fully formed, otherwise healthy individual twin. The undeveloped twin is defined as parasitic, rather than conjoined, because it is incompletely formed or wholly dependent on the body functions of the complete fetus. The independent twin is called the autosite.

Conjoined-parasitic twins joined at the head are described as craniopagus or cephalopagus, and occipitalis if joined in the occipital region or parietalis if joined in the parietal region.

Craniopagus parasiticus is a general term for a parasitic head attached to the head of a more fully developed fetus or infant.

Fetus in fetu sometimes is interpreted as a special case of parasitic twin, but may be a distinct entity.

The Twin reversed arterial perfusion, or TRAP sequence, results in an acardiac twin, a parasitic twin that fails to develop a head, arms and a heart. The parasitic twin, little more than a torso with or without legs, receives its blood supply from the host twin by means of an umbilical cord-like structure, much like a fetus in fetu, except the acardiac twin is outside the host twin’s body. The blood received by the parastitic twin has already been used by normal fetus, and as such is already de-oxygenated, leaving little developmental nutrients for the acardiac twin. Because it is pumping blood for both itself and its acardiac twin, this causes extreme stress on the normal fetus’s heart. Many TRAP pregnancies result in heart failure for the healthy twin. On 12 December 2008 a Brisbane mother watched this occur during ultrasound. She reported that “their heart just slowed and stopped. There was no jerking or movement from the babies. They just slowed and stopped”. This twinning condition usually occurs very early in pregnancy.  A rare variant of the acardiac fetus is the acardius acormus where the head is well-developed but the heart and the rest of the body are rudimentary. While it is thought that the classical TRAP/Acardius sequence is due to a retrograde flow from the umbilical arteries of the pump twin to the iliac arteries of the acardiac twin resulting in preferential caudal perfusion, acardius acormus is thought to be a result of an early embryopathy.

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