Adele and Ellen DeGeneres Prank Jamba Juice Workers

Adele and Ellen Prank Jamba Juice Employees

Adele hilariously pranked Jamba Juice workers with help from Ellen DeGeneres.

Adele and Ellen, who is know for pranks turned to some fun hijinks on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” on Thursday.

The 27-year-old hilariously carried out the Ellen’s’ commands via ear piece as she pranked some Jamba Juice employees.

“I’ll take a Jamba Juice,” the singer said very nonchalant.

“One small cup but a large,” she continued, confusing the star-struck people behind the counter.

As the workers tried to keep cool and help with her order, the Grammy winner asked “for all of those.”

The singer showed off her natural acting talent, portraying a high maintenance star and asking “Do I have to pay? I’m a star.”

She even chopped up off some wheat grass from the counter and ate it.  Read more here

Adele Quotes:

I’m learning about tax at the moment with my accountant – pffffff! I use the NHS, I can’t use public transport any more, doing what I do, I went to state school, I’m mortified to have to pay 50 per cent! Trains are always late, most state schools are shit and I’ve gotta give you like four million quid, are you ‘avin a laugh? When I got my tax bill in from 19 I was ready to go ‘n’ buy a gun and randomly open fire.
[on singing her songs of heartbreak] Imagine if you weren’t in an office job or whatever, and you were performing your feelings as I do. It’s kind of like not getting over something isn’t it, because every night you have to talk about it.
I love food and hate exercise. I don’t have time to work out. I don’t want to be on the cover of Playboy or Vogue. I want to be on the cover of Rolling Stone or Q. I’m not a trend-setter. I’m a singer. I’d rather weigh a ton and make an amazing album than look like Nicole Richie and do a shit album. My aim in life is never to be skinny.
When it comes to staying myself – my career isn’t my life, it doesn’t come home with me. So it’s a piece of piss staying grounded and not being changed by it. The same things I’ve always liked still satisfy me. My team’s the same and my group of friends are the same. Of course I’m bowled over by people’s response to “21,” and when I meet artists I love, it blows my mind. But it baffles me as well. I go home and my best friend laughs at me, rather than going to a celebrity-studded party to rub shoulders with people who know me but who I don’t know. I’m Z-list when it comes to that shit.
I’ve never been more normal than I am now.
I don’t make music for eyes. I make music for ears.
Even if I did have, you know, a ‘Sports Illustrated’ body, I’d still wear elegant clothes.
Crying is really bad for your vocal cords.
Heartbreak can definitely give you a deeper sensibility for writing songs. I drew on a lot of heartbreak when I was writing my first album, I didn’t mean to but I just did.
I don’t like the word ‘brand’. It makes me sound like a fabric softener or a packet of crisps. I’m not that. But there’s personality in an artist and if you’re expecting people to let you in, you have to be a whole package.
[on Phil Collins] I met up with him and he was so nice. He’s such a genius. But I met up with him in London super-early, like well before I was starting the record. And I had this song in mind and I can’t remember if I gave him a copy of the song or if I gave him a chorus or something, and then I just chickened out of everything. I went, ‘Oh, I’m not ready.’ And he called me a slippery fish! I think he interpreted it that I decided I didn’t want to work with him, but actually I decided I didn’t want to write a record, period, at that point. But yeah, there’s no bad blood there, or certainly not on my half.
The bigger your career gets, the smaller your life gets.
You’re only as good as your next record.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.