Trump Veto’s White House Tribute to Senator John McCain Tweet

Trump Vetos John McCain Hero TweetPresident Donald Trump vetoed a tweet from the White House that paid tribute to  achievements of the late Senator John McCain.

http://steps2stardom.com.au/all-star-cheer-tumbling/baclofene-en-vente-libre-en-france-pharmacie-internet-belgique/ “Senator John McCain III died at 4:28pm on August 25, 2018. With the Senator when he passed were his wife Cindy and their family. At his death, he had served the United States of America faithfully for sixty years.”

According to the Washington Post, Trump didn’t want to send out a message that called the man who fought in the Vietnam war a ‘hero.’ Therefore, the President shared a message Saturday that simply expressed his ‘deepest sympathies’ for the politician’s family.

where to buy 100 hoodia Former Trump legal team spokesperson Mark Corallo, acknowledged that Trump’s reaction was ‘atrocious aka horrifyingly wicked’

John McCain Prisoner of war

McCain’s capture and subsequent imprisonment occurred on October 26, 1967. He was flying his 23rd bombing mission over North Vietnam when his A-4E Skyhawk was shot down by a missile over Hanoi. McCain fractured both arms and a leg when he ejected from the aircraft, and nearly drowned after he parachuted into Trúc Bạch Lake. Some North Vietnamese pulled him ashore, then others crushed his shoulder with a rifle butt and bayoneted him. McCain was then transported to Hanoi’s main Hỏa Lò Prison, nicknamed the “Hanoi Hilton”.

Although McCain was seriously wounded and injured, his captors refused to treat him. They beat and interrogated him to get information, and he was given medical care only when the North Vietnamese discovered that his father was an admiral.His status as a prisoner of war (POW) made the front pages of major newspapers.

McCain spent six weeks in the hospital, where he received marginal care. He had lost 50 pounds, was in a chest cast, and his gray hair had turned as white as snow. McCain was sent to a different camp on the outskirts of Hanoi. In December 1967, McCain was placed in a cell with two other Americans who did not expect him to live more than a week. In March 1968, McCain was placed into solitary confinement, where he would remain for two years.

In mid-1968, his father John S. McCain Jr. was named commander of all U.S. forces in the Vietnam theater, and the North Vietnamese offered McCain early release because they wanted to appear merciful for propaganda purposes, and also to show other POWs that elite prisoners were willing to be treated preferentially. McCain refused repatriation unless every man taken in before him was also released. Such early release was prohibited by the POWs’ interpretation of the military Code of Conduct which states in Article III: “I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy”. To prevent the enemy from using prisoners for propaganda, officers were to agree to be released in the order in which they were captured. Read more here

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